Reading and Writing Quotations

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https://en.wikipedia.org

“Read a lot. Reading really helps. Read anything you can get your hands on.”                                    J. K. Rowling

 

“I always advise children who ask me for tips on being a writer to read as much as they possibly can. Jane Austen gave a young friend the same advice, so I’m in good company there.”                                         J. K. Rowling

 

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https://en.wikipedia.org

“Believe in yourself. Keep writing.”  Neil Gaiman

“Fiction can show you a different world. It can take you somewhere you’ve never been. Once you’ve visited other worlds, like those who ate fairy fruit, you can never be entirely content with the world that you grew up in. Discontent is a good thing: discontented people can modify and improve their worlds, leave them better, leave them different.”                                              Neil Gaiman

 

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https://en.wikipedia.org

“You don’t have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them.”            Ray Bradbury

“You must write every single day of your life… You must lurk in libraries and climb the stacks like ladders to sniff books like perfumes and wear books like hats upon your crazy heads… may you be in love every day for the next 20,000 days. And out of that love, remake a world.”

                                                                  Ray Bradbury

August Self-Promotion Party!

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(Photo by Lisa Fotios on Pexels.com)

Hello to all the writers out there and reading this blog!

It is well into the month of August, so it is time for a shameless self-promotion party, so please do not be shy about your work.

Writers need to be their own best publicists, and we should also help each other!

Let the world know about your book(s)!

Shout to the world about your writing!

Tell us about your book(s), and leave an image and a link if you can.

In order for as many people to see your work as possible, please Tweet, and reblog this post!

Please remember to be proud of your work!

Here is my shameless self-promotion: my latest book can help writers who have issues with finishing first drafts of their books. If that is you, I offer direct, practical advice on how to Get The Draft Done! Helping Writers Finish Their First Draft by Charles F. French.

 

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Get The Draft Done! is available here: Amazon.com

 

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Gallows Hill can be found here in ebook.

Gallows Hill in paperback can be found here.

An interview about Gallows Hill can be found here.

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Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

interview

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Available on Amazon

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Available on Amazon

Becoming Inspired to Write

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Here is another wonderful post from the excellent teacher, Jennie!

A Teacher's Reflections

The days have been hot and humid, not the best for writing.  Today I had a huge dose of inspiration.  I played with E.B. White’s Underwood typewriter.  Really.

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I was so very careful.  Of course I didn’t hit a key.  What I did was even better; the keys on the typewriter are slightly indented and round, perfect for a finger.  I fingered the keys, running the tips of my fingers in circles on each key.  I was soaking in all the words E.B. White had typed.

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This typewriter typed “some pig”, “terrific”, and many more wonderful words.  Did I find those letter keys?  T-E-R-R-I-F-I-C?  Of course I did.  Can you imagine the feeling of touching the words E.B. White wrote?

There’s more.

E.B. White read aloud Charlotte’s Web.  His original recording, chapter by chapter, was made on record albums in a boxed set.  I had no idea.

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I opened the…

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Through The Nethergate by Roberta Eaton Cheadle — A Review

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I am very happy to write this review of an excellent novel I have just finished reading!

Through The Nethergate by Roberta Eaton Cheadle is a wonderful YA novel that will be appreciated by readers of all ages! Cheadle does an excellent job of weaving true historical characters into her tale that pits a teenaged girl, along with her Grandfather, and a few other helpers, against the very forces of Hell itself.

I deeply appreciated the way Cheadle was able to tell the historical tales and intertwine them into the main plot. Cheadle makes this book about history and its connection to our times.

Her development of characters is very strong, and the reader will care what happens to Margaret, the young protagonist of this novel. Margaret is a very special young lady who along, with a supernatural ability, shows empathy and courage as she faces terrible horrors. She witnesses the terrible actions of people in the past as well as seeing what can happen today. Margaret asks, “Do you think the world will ever change? I mean, do you think humanity will ever learn from its past mistakes and be able to turn away from greed, corruption, and jealousy?”  That is a truly important question.

Cheadle has written a true page-turner, a tale of ghosts and horror, and a book that confronts current and past evil.  I recommend this novel highly!

A New Exhibit, Eric Carle’s Art Comes Full Circle…and More

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Here is another wonderful post from Jennie, the excellent teacher!

A Teacher's Reflections

After months of having to close its doors to the public, the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Massachusetts has reopened.  I was thrilled.  The number of visitors and safety procedures were controlled, yet the experience was full and open – I was once again a child on discovery.

And discover, I did.

In my customary note of appreciation to the museum I said,
“It always astounds me that every single visit to the Eric Carle Museum is nothing short of remarkable.  Really.  Today was no exception.  The angels exhibit was nothing at all like what I expected, and one of the best exhibits I have seen.”

As a member of the museum, I was greeted so warmly upon my return by the staff- like an old friend.  They gave me extra copies of their spring newsletter (where I am featured), and asked to take my picture.  I…

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Returning to Dining With Authors

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(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_Renaissance_theatre)

The drawing of the Swan Theatre (1596)

Hamlet, Doctor Faustus, The Tempest, and Edward the Second are just a few of the plays produced by the two greatest playwrights of the Renaissance: William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe. Born in the same year–1564, they were the two premier writers of their age and arguably among the  most important of any era. These are writers who have informed both my studies and entranced my imagination.  At Muhlenberg College, I teach Renaissance drama courses and Shakespeare . This summer I am teaching a course called Renaissance Plays In Process, in which we look at several plays and the circumstances surrounding them in the Renaissance as well as how they might be produced today. Whenever I can, I love teaching about these playwrights.

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https://pixabay.com

Christopher Marlowe

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Marlowe

I would love to have the opportunity through a magic time machine to sit down and have a conversation with these two giants of the theater. I would invite both writers to spend an afternoon or evening at a pub–English of course–and over beer and food discuss many topics with them. I am sure that sometimes I would simply listen to them.

I would love to hear what they said about their work and how they felt about each other. I would love to learn from them the specifics of the way their plays were staged. I would ask Marlowe about his mysterious work for the Queen of England.  Was he a spy?  I do not know if he would answer, but I would still have to ask.

I would ask Shakespeare about the canon of his plays.  Were there plays he wrote that are currently lost?  If so, what are they? And I have often wondered if he ever considered writing a tragedy about King Arthur.

I also wonder how the two great writers would behave together. Would this be a polite conversation, a deep discussion of theatrical issues, or a wild and fiery debate or argument among bitter rivals?

I wish I could speak with them.

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https://pixabay.com

 

If you could speak with 2 or 3  authors, no matter living or dead, who would they be? Where would you like to have the meeting?

Books That Are Needed Now

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Some books speak to a specific time, and some reach across eras with their messages. Some include a message for a definite audience, while others span a more general readership.  And some times call out for certain books to be read.

Books are one form of the Media, which must remain free if freedom itself is to survive. Given the turmoil of our present time, I am suggesting these books as crucial reading for today’s world:

1984

by

 George Orwell

 

1984

(https://commons.wikimedia.org)

 

Night

by

Elie Wiesel

 

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(http://night2011.wikispaces.com)

 

It Can’t Happen Here

by

 Sinclair Lewis

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(https://en.wikipedia.org)

I have offered three books I consider to be essential for our times.

What books or books do you think are needed now?

 

Shakespeare on Wisdom

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“The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.”

                                               As You Like It

 

And seeing ignorance is the curse of God, Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven”

                                              Henry VI, Part 2

 

“There is no darkness but ignorance”

                                              Twelfth Night

 

 

Look Up, Look Down

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Here is a lovely post about keeping wonder alive from that excellent teacher Jennie!

A Teacher's Reflections

We can all take a lesson from children.  They notice everything.  They look up, and they look down.  They stop to look, really look, and to wonder.  They remember what they see, and if an adult is around they ask questions.

The wonder children see is always there.  We just have to stop and look up and look down.  I did that tonight.

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I looked up.

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I looked down.

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The moon began to rise.  Do you see it on the left?  I stayed to watch, and it looked like the Northern Lights were in the sky.  The sky changes quickly, so I pay attention.

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The moon is high.  The sky and trees are beautiful.  It reminds me of summer camp and slow evenings of wonder.  It reminds me of the lyrics to Taps, played by a bugle.

Day is done, gone the sun,
From the lake, from the hills, from…

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Thank You to the Eric Carle Museum, and Kate DiCamillo’s New Book.

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Here is another wonderful post from the excellent teacher, Jennie!

A Teacher's Reflections

Just before the pandemic hit, the Eric Carle Museum asked me if they could include in their quarterly newsletter my story, my blog post, about visiting the museum and hearing author Kate DiCamillo speak.

Yes!  Of course, yes!

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They enjoy reading my blog posts about my visits to the museum.  Well, how can I not write about a visit?  Every one is remarkable.  When I heard Kate DiCamillo speak, the blog post flowed.  She is one of my favorite authors- for many reasons.

Little did I know that my inclusion in the newsletter would be a full page.  What an honor!  Thank you Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art!  Their write-up was terrific.

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Good News!

The museum is opening this week for members only (I snagged my reservation right away) before it opens in August for the public.  Yes, the protocol procedures will be strictly enforced.  I will have…

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