A Quotation From William Shakespeare Part I

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I am beginning a new series of quotations, in which I will feature pieces from one particular author for several weeks. I begin with the best and most important, William Shakespeare.

photo of black ceramic male profile statue under grey sky during daytime

(Photo by Mike on Pexels.com)

You do look, my son, in a moved sort,
As if you were dismayed: be cheerful, sir.
Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits and
Are melted into air, into thin air;
And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capped tow’rs, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve,
And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with sleep.

The Tempest (4. 1. 146-158)

Shakespeare, William. The Complete Works of Shakespeare Seventh Edition. David

Bevington. Editor. Pearson. Boston. 2014.

13 thoughts on “A Quotation From William Shakespeare Part I

  1. I like your quote, Charles. My favorite is the overused song of the witches:
    Double, double toil and trouble;
    Fire burn and caldron bubble.
    Fillet of a fenny snake,
    In the caldron boil and bake;
    Eye of newt and toe of frog,
    Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
    Adder’s fork and blind-worm’s sting,
    Lizard’s leg and howlet’s wing,
    For a charm of powerful trouble,
    Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.

    Double, double toil and trouble;
    Fire burn and caldron bubble.
    Cool it with a baboon’s blood,
    Then the charm is firm and good.

    Completely wonderful words. I am sure this extract has inspired many of the fantasy and supernatural books that are popular today.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ah, yes. The works of imagination “shall dissolve” like an “insubstantial pageant,” but the works of the bard like the works of Prospero give evidence that imagination once dissolved transforms reality for good.

    Liked by 1 person

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