Another Member Of The U.L.S. — Robbie Cheadle Writes On The Red Badge of Courage

Standard

uls-logo-31

I want to welcome Robbie Cheadle to the U. L. S., The Underground Library Society! This group is an unofficial collection of people who deeply value books. It is based on the idea of The Book People from Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury.  Robbie is the newest member of this group of book lovers!

Robbie has excellent blogs: Robbie Cheadle books/poems/reviews and   Robbie’s inspiration. Both are wonderful; please be sure to visit them.

The Red Badge of Courage

Background

The Red Badge of Courage is a novel about the American Civil War, written by American author, Stephen Crane. Although the author was born after the war and had not ever participated in a battle when he wrote the book, The Red Badge of Courage is cited for its realism and naturalism.

The book depicts several very vivid and intense battle scenes which are graphically depicted from the perspective of the young protagonist, Henry Fleming, a private in the Union Army. The book explores the themes of maturism, heroism and cowardice with regards to Fleming’s regiment which comprises mainly of inexperienced first-time soldiers who have conscripted for various reasons and the indifference of nature to the follies of man.

The red badge of courage referred to in the title of the book is a wound incurred during battle.

My review of this book

The Red Badge of Courage was a fascinating insight into the psychology of warfare for young recruits who have never experienced battle before. I read the author’s biography and was astonished that he had never experienced war before he wrote this startling descriptive and vivid account of the fictional 304th New York Infantry Regiment during the American Civil War.

The main character is 18-year old man from a farming background called Henry Fleming. Henry is tired of the monotony of his life helping his mother on the farm and enlists because he has romanticized battle as a result of reading several accounts of war. He is attracted by his perceived glamour of battle and enlists against the advice of his mother. When she attempts to give him some practical advice before he leaves to join his new regiment, he resents her words which belie and detract from his romantic notions.

Henry’s main ambition is to prove that he is man enough to be a soldier, and he suffers endless anxiety about how he will react when his regiment eventually sees some action on the front. He becomes friendly with a number of his compatriots, including a young man named Jim Conklin, who confesses that he would run from battle if all his peers did so.

Henry’s regiment finally faces the enemy and is successful during their first session of combat. After a short reprieve, the regiment faces the enemy again and this time Henry is convinced that his regiment will lose and he runs away from the battle. He retreats into a nearby wood and comes across a dead body. In his fear and fright at coming across this grim sight, he joins up with a group of injured soldiers, one of whom is is friend, Jim Conklin. Henry is deeply ashamed of his cowardly behavior and does his best to hide the fact that he is not injured but has fled the battle. He manages to get away with it, but his disgust at his own behavior and fear of discovery results in later behaviour that is almost reckless and lacking in reasonable self-care in his attempt to redeem himself in his own mind.

I loved the characterisation of Henry as a thinker and a person who is sensitive to his own potential failings and fears. I am sure that many young men must feel like this when faced with the real possibility of their own imminent death. The effect of peer pressure and the comradery or brotherhood of soldiers when in a group is also intriguing and believable.

Once again, thank you to Robbie Cheadle, and welcome to the U. L. S., The Underground Library Society!

uls-logo-11

 

Rest In Peace Stan Lee

Standard

Stan_Lee_by_Gage_Skidmore_3

(Gage Skidmore)

Stan Lee, the guiding creative genius behind the golden age of Marvel Comics and the current explosion of Marvel movies has died today at the age of 95.

Mr. Lee was an enormous influence in my life. As a child, I was completely absorbed in comic books, and through Marvel’s stories, I learned of heroes with human flaws and a world that had many difficulties. Out of his guidance came such important figures as Spiderman, Ironman, Thor, and my personal favorite–Captain America.

captain-america-1293949__340

(https://pixabay.com)

Lee took these characters past the simple fight-the-supervillain-approach of so many other brands of superheroes. In Spiderman, I identified with a high school science nerd who could defeat villains but remained a lonely kid. In Thor, I reveled in learning about another mythology that had previously been completely unknown. In Captain America, I saw the man who was not the superpatriot but the opposer of bullies everywhere. Captain America came to be the moral center of the Marvel Universe, one who would battle oppression no matter from where it came.

Thank you to Stan Lee–you had a lasting influence on my life.

R. I. P. Stan Lee

 

https://www.instagram.com/charlesfrenchauthor/

 

Please Remember the D-Day Invasion

Standard

1280px-Into_the_Jaws_of_Death_23-0455M_edit

(https://commons.wikimedia.org)

Please let us all take a moment and remember the sacrifices of those men, often little more than boys, who took part in the largest military invasion in the history of humanity: Operation Overlord. Thanks to their courage, they were able to begin the end of Hitler’s reign of terror in Europe. The invasion began on June 6, 1944 and lasted until the middle of July in 1944.

Many soldiers from a variety of countries lost their lives during this campaign, and today several cemeteries exist to honor those who fell. One such sacred place is the Normandy American Cemetery.

800px-WW2_Normandy_American_Cemetery_Rain

(https://commons.wikimedia.org)

 

To all who fought to defeat Fascism, I give my thanks.

Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

Standard

Maledicus Final

I have changed the title of my horror novel Evil Lives After to Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I.  An extraordinary cover has been designed for the book by Judy Bullard at customebookcovers@cox.net.  I recommend her highly. Her designs are professional and of excellent quality, and Judy will work with you to create the cover you need and are happy with!

I am targeting late September for the book’s release.

Here is a little about my novel:

“All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.” (Edmund Burke)

Roosevelt Theodore Franklin attempts to make it through life day by day.  Roosevelt is a widower, who lost his beloved wife to cancer and a retired history professor, and he has not stopped grieving.  Along with his two closest friends, also retired and who have also lost loved ones, the three men form a paranormal investigation group.  They hope to find an answer to the question: is there life after death?

When asked by a local teacher to investigate a possible haunting of her house, the group discovers an evil beyond anything they could have imagined.  This is no mere ghost. Maledicus, who was in life a pimp, torturer, and murderer during Caligula’s reign in Rome, in death has become a sociopathic demon that attacks the weak and the innocent.  Maledicus threatens a five year old child’s life and soul.  Terrified by what they have discovered, Roosevelt and his friends must choose to either walk away from this threat, or to do battle with this ancient creature at the potential loss of their sanities, their lives, and their souls.

Look for my book to follow this battle.