Please Honor Memorial Day

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I hope all of you have had a wonderful weekend, but I also hope you remember why this holiday, Memorial Day, exists.  The word “holiday” comes from “holy day,” and the remembrance of this day and its purpose should be sacred. It was originally known as Decoration Day after the end of the Civil War, and it was designated Memorial Day in the 20th Century.

This day is intended to honor, give thanks, and remember those who have sacrificed their lives for The United States of America.  Please honor the fallen and the wounded on this day.  I realize the day was meant originally for the dead, but I extend my wishes and  thanks to the wounded also. Regardless of political beliefs or stands on a war, these are the men and women who fought to keep us safe, and they deserve our remembrance.

They deserve our thanks and our honor.

Please keep in mind that this day is not merely the beginning of the summer season, nor is it intended to be the time of a special sale. This should be a sacred and somber time. There will be plenty of opportunity for shopping and vacationing afterwards. Please remember those who sacrificed.

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Mr. Trump, do you have no decency?

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I try not to be political in this blog, but I cannot be silent.

President Trump has a history of attacking service members and their families, which gives the lie to his claim that he supports the military.  He attacked Senator McCain, a gold star family, and now Admiral McRaven, a former Navy Seal and special operations commander, who lead the attack and capture of Osama bin Laden, the Al-Qaeda leader and one of America’s greatest enemies.

Trump is a man who avoided military service and who places self-interest above all else. Admiral McRaven, conversely, has lead a life of serving the United States of America. I am not concerned with the Admiral’s political views. I respect him no matter if conservative or liberal. He served the country honorably.

To paraphrase Joseph Welch, whose opposition to Senator McCarthy during the Army-McCarthy hearings helped end McCarthy’s cruel, unAmerican, and tyrannical approach to justice, I ask President Trump — Do you have no decency? Finally, Sir, do you have no decency?

President Trump, stop attacking our military.

Roosevelt Franklin–Anglophile–from Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I by Charles F. French

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Roosevelt Franklin, the protagonist of my horror novel Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I is a self-admitted anglophile. While a proud American with a very American name who loves his country, he is drawn to the manners and customs of England and the British Isles.

He embraces courtesy and dignity, but he despises snobbery and bigotry. He was raised in a very wealthy family, and he rejects their view that people in the classes below them are intended to serve as underlings. He loves British customs, but he abhors the rigid class system of that culture. He is more comfortable with his friends from varying backgrounds than he is enduring an evening of cocktails with his family, most of whom he has distanced himself from.

Roosevelt loves old-fashioned, hand tailored British wool suits. He feels the most at ease when he wears them. “They may look old-fashioned, but that is completely appropriate, because I am very old-fashioned,” he would say about the appearance of his attire.

He insists on showing courtesy, not as an act of thoughtless and forced behavior, but as a conscious attempt to provide a touch of civility in a decidedly uncivil world. He still handwrites thank you notes for any gifts or kindnesses he has received. “Using pen and paper shows more consideration than simply typing a note on the computer screen.” He definitely is not a fan of the contemporary so-called connected age.

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Roosevelt’s favorite authors are also British and have stood the test of time: Shakespeare and Chaucer. “To read Shakespeare is to glean what it means to be human,” was one of his favorite sayings about the Bard.

And one of his favorite meals was a traditional British style breakfast, complete, with tea or coffee, toast and jam, eggs, and rashers of bacon and sausage.  In the evening, an after dinner relaxation was drinking several fingers of excellent single malt Scotch Whisky and having a fine cigar.

For travel, no place in the world rivaled London for Roosevelt. It was simply the City to him. In his very American soul also resided an old-fashioned British gentleman.

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Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

interview

Another Successful Meeting

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I am happy to say that the Grounds For Thought Literary Group had another successful and productive meeting tonight at the Taylor Roasted Coffeehouse in Northampton, PA. I have mentioned this before, but it is definitely worth repeating that this is the best coffeehouse in the Lehigh Valley, PA. Not only are the owner and manager very decent people, but they also have the best coffee—roasted on the premises—and the best atmosphere for creativity. It is like having a little bit of Soho in eastern PA.

The turnout was good—about 13-14 people, with a good mixture of writers and listeners. In these meetings, no one is compelled to do anything, but all are encouraged to read some of their work or a few pages of writing they have enjoyed. If they prefer, they can simply listen and enjoy the readings.
I read another chapter of my novel Evil Lives After, a supernatural thriller. This chapter, as do several others, deals with historical events that some of the characters lived through. This one takes place during the second battle of Fallujah and features two important characters in the novel. I was concerned about the narrative showing realistic and believable fighting, and I received useful feedback.

Several others read chapters from their books, including novels, memoirs, and nonfiction. All of the writing was strong, and the participants gave useful and positive critique. I was very pleased that the writers and listeners all took a very serious and respectful approach to the session.

I look forward to the next session, which has yet to be scheduled, but it will be sometime in February.