Open a new door: a collection of poems by Kim Blades and Robbie Cheadle–A Review

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Open a New Door

I am delighted to offer a review of this excellent book of poetry!

This book is a lovely collection of poetry from two talented writers-Kim Blades and Robbie Cheadle! Their poetry is interwoven, as they explore important thematic issues in life in South Africa. The structure of the book is extremely effective: the poets use this format–“The Good”, “The Bad”, and “The Ugly” as they explore various aspects of life in their land: “God bless Africa”, “God bless my family and friends”, “God bless me”, and “God bless corporates and work.”

Both poets use a variety of poetic forms and show great observations about their world, their people, and themselves. This is a deeply compelling collection of poems.

While both poets offer a large variety of excellent pieces, I will highlight two that particularly stood out to me: “The boys under the bridge” by Robbie Cheadle, in which the poet’s concern for others and her deeply felt humanity is clear, and “Lessons learned in a rural African village” by Kim Blades, in which the poet speaks of the love of nature and humanity that she learned from her mother and her world.

If you love poetry, then please buy and read this book!

I give this wonderful collection of poetry 5 stars!

You can find the book here: Amazon 

Robbie Cheadle Books/poems/Reviews

Robbie’s inspiration

kimbladeswriting

Please be sure to visit their sites!

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A Published Poem By My Friend Rob Fillman

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I wanted to share the exciting news that my friend and colleague Robert Fillman has a poem in the journal Canary: A Literary Journal Of The Environmental Crisis.

The link is here: Canary A Literary Journal of the Environmental Crisis

The Science Teacher

by Robert Fillman

Robert lives in the Lehigh River Watershed in eastern Pennsylvania.

When old Mrs. Helmut got sick
Miss Carson was her substitute.
She was young, straight out of college,
voice as soft as the knee-high grass
in the fields behind the playground.
She taught us about recycling,
how to conserve more energy
by swapping incandescent bulbs,
hanging our wet clothes on the line,
unplugging old appliances.
She asked us if we had ever
heated water with a peanut,
forced our nine-year-old minds to think
beyond broken chalk and blackboards.
We made compost in the courtyard
out of our leftovers from lunch,
went on field trips to Cedar Creek,
gathered specimens to study.
She took us to the water works
where we watched sewage get filtered
into vats and sent to landfills.
My dad called her a tree hugger.
My mom thought she was too involved,
too motivated, much too bold
for her own good. Both couldn’t wait
for Mrs. Helmut to return,
for the leaves of enlightenment
to fall. The last time I saw her
she was staring out the window
of our fourth-grade classroom, singing
to herself while she watched a group
of sparrows and nuthatches peck
at the sunflower seed feeders
we made for her going away.

 

Congratulations to Robert Fillman on his publication!