Returning to Dining With Authors

Standard

300px-The_Swan_cropped

(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_Renaissance_theatre)

The drawing of the Swan Theatre (1596)

Hamlet, Doctor Faustus, The Tempest, and Edward the Second are just a few of the plays produced by the two greatest playwrights of the Renaissance: William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe. Born in the same year–1564, they were the two premier writers of their age and arguably among the  most important of any era. These are writers who have informed both my studies and entranced my imagination.  At Muhlenberg College, I teach Renaissance drama courses and Shakespeare . This summer I am teaching a course called Renaissance Plays In Process, in which we look at several plays and the circumstances surrounding them in the Renaissance as well as how they might be produced today. Whenever I can, I love teaching about these playwrights.

shakespeare-67698_960_720

https://pixabay.com

Christopher Marlowe

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Marlowe

I would love to have the opportunity through a magic time machine to sit down and have a conversation with these two giants of the theater. I would invite both writers to spend an afternoon or evening at a pub–English of course–and over beer and food discuss many topics with them. I am sure that sometimes I would simply listen to them.

I would love to hear what they said about their work and how they felt about each other. I would love to learn from them the specifics of the way their plays were staged. I would ask Marlowe about his mysterious work for the Queen of England.  Was he a spy?  I do not know if he would answer, but I would still have to ask.

I would ask Shakespeare about the canon of his plays.  Were there plays he wrote that are currently lost?  If so, what are they? And I have often wondered if he ever considered writing a tragedy about King Arthur.

I also wonder how the two great writers would behave together. Would this be a polite conversation, a deep discussion of theatrical issues, or a wild and fiery debate or argument among bitter rivals?

I wish I could speak with them.

wishing-well-76869_960_720

https://pixabay.com

 

If you could speak with 2 or 3  authors, no matter living or dead, who would they be? Where would you like to have the meeting?

Quotations From Hamlet

Standard

Hamlet is one of my favorite plays. I consider it to be one of the most difficult, dense, and deep of William Shakespeare’s tragedies. I have read it many times, seen numerous stage and film productions, and have taught it in many of my classes. I have the joy of teaching it this summer in my “Renaissance Plays in Process” class for the Wescoe School of Muhlenberg College, and I will teach it again this fall in “Shakespeare.” I thought, therefore, I would offer a few of the important quotations from the play.

 

hamlet-3013170_960_720

(https://pixabay.com)

“There is special providence in the fall of a sparrow; if it be now, ’tis not to come; if it be not to come, it will be now; if it be not now, yet it will come. The readiness is all.” (Act 5. Scene 2. Lines 217-220)

 

“Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.” (Act 1. Scene 4. Line 90)

 

“The play’s the thing/Wherein I’ll catch the conscience of the king.” (Act 2. Scene 2. Lines 605-606)

shakespeare-67698_960_720

(https://pixabay.com)

Works Cited

Shakespeare, William. The Complete Works of Shakespeare 4th Edition. David

Bevington Ed. Longman. Chicago. 1997.

 

Quotations on Thinking

Standard

albert-einstein-401484_960_720

(https://pixabay.com)

“The world as we have created it is a process of our thinking. It cannot be changed without changing our thinking.”

                                                                        Albert Einstein

voltaire-2702980_960_720

(https://pixabay.com)

“Judge a man by his questions rather than by his answers.”

                                                                        Voltaire

 

leonardo-da-vinci-1125056_960_720

“He who thinks little errs much…”

                                                                        Leonardo Da Vinci

 

 

Quotations in William Shakespeare’s The Tempest

Standard

Here are three quotations from The Tempest by William Shakespeare, one of his romances, formerly called the tragi-comedies, a genre he worked in toward the end of his incredible career. I have used this play often in my classes both at the Wescoe School for adult students at Muhlenberg College and at Lehigh University.

shakespeare-67698_960_720 (1)

(https://pixabay.com)

“You do look, my son, in a moved sort,

 As if you were dismay’d; be cheerful, sir.

 Our revels now are ended. These our actors,

  As I foretold you, were all spirits and

 Are melted into air: into thin air

 And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,

 The cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces,

 The solemn temples, the great globe itself,

 Ye, all which it inherit, shall dissolve

 And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,

 Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff

 As dreams are made on, and our little life

 Is rounded with a sleep.”

(The Tempest Act 4. Scene 1. Lines 161-173.)

 

william-hamilton-prospero-ariel

(William Hamilton)

“But this rough magic

 I here abjure, and, when I have required

 Some heavenly music, which even now I do,

To work my end upon their senses that

 This airy charm is for, I’ll break my staff,

 Bury it certain fathoms in the earth,

 And deeper than did ever plummet sound

I’ll drown my book.”

(The Tempest Act 5. Scene 1. Lines 55-62)

 

Miranda_-_The_Tempest_JWW

(John William Waterhouse)

“O, wonder!

 How many goodly creatures are there here!

 How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world,

 That has such people in’t”

(The Tempest Act 5. Scene 1. Lines (203-206)